Quality Products International

Major retailers including Target, Myer and Just Jeans in a massive product recall

by on May.09, 2014, under China QC Inspection Blog

Over 120,000 items have been recalled by a number of major Australian Retailers.

Excerpt of ACCC article:

Textiles recalled after ACCC tests reveal high levels of hazardous azo dyes

Azo dyes are a large class of very effective synthetic dyes used for colouring a variety of consumer goods such as foods, cosmetics, carpets, clothes, leather and textiles.

A small proportion of azo dyes can contain, or can break down to form, a class of chemical substances referred to as ‘aromatic amines’.

Aromatic amines can migrate from clothing and leather articles dyed with azo dyes.  The amount released can increase with body heat, sweat or saliva.  Benzidine and other aromatic amines may be absorbed through the skin from dyed clothing and articles where there is direct and prolonged contact with the skin.  Articles not in both direct and prolonged contact with the skin do not expose consumers to the hazard.

Certain aromatic amines such as benzidine are hazardous to human health.  Expert authorities such as the World Health Organisation International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) have classified some of these aromatic amines as known, or suspected human carcinogens. Exposure to a carcinogen does not mean cancer will result.

While consumer exposure to hazardous azo dyes is likely to be very low, the associated cancer risks give cause for concern. As a result, exposure to certain azo dyes, including benzidine-based dyes, should be minimised or eliminated.

There are no specific regulatory limits on these dyes in Australia. The ACCC has made recommendations to Government and on 24 April 2014 the Minister – The Hon Bruce Billson, activated a process to assess whether further regulation is required. This process will involve broad stakeholder consultation and include the development of a Regulation Impact Statement.

See full Recall List and Article at Product Safety Recalls Australia

Excerpt of ABC article.

Jean dye cancer risk prompts recall of more than 121,000 items of clothing

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has issued a warning about a dangerous dye found in jeans on sale in Australian stores.

The ACCC says it tested a number of clothing items for dangerous azo dyes after being tipped off by the National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Scheme.

The tests uncovered clothes with high concentrations of the dyes, sparking recalls of more than 121,000 items from retailers including Myer, Target, Rivers, Trade Secret and Just Jeans.

A number of children’s clothes, including jeans from Myer, Just Jeans and Target, were included in the recall.

The dyes have also been found in bed sheets and pillowcases sold through Pillow Talk.

See full Article at ABC News Australia

A product recall is every buyer and brand managers worst nightmare.

The best place to start in preventing recalls is in the product specification, which should be at the foundation of every good QA / QC program.

Most factories can work with their suppliers in providing detailed lists of raw materials. Most will have pre existing lab tests, with the levels of hazardous substances which would typically cause concerns.

The next major step is to test “YOUR PRODUCT” in a lab. The pre existing lab tests, will give you some comfort that the parties in the supply chain are capable of producing compliant raw materials. None the less they will be from earlier batches and should not be relied upon, in their own right.

You can certainly ask the factory to do the testing.

QPILtd recommends that you test the raw materials on arrival at the factory. We can send an inspector to check that the sample/s selected is representative of the batch as a whole. This is normally done as a single man day visit.

The inspector then sends your raw material samples directly to a pre agreed lab.

If there are any problems or concerns with product, you will have the lab test early in the production cycle, so have a better opportunity to address any issues.

Similarly, once production is under way, QPILtd suggests a DUPRO visit, to report on the finished product.

Samples can be collected, which again are typical of the quality in bulk production, rather than one the production manager has “specially selected” for approval.

Samples can be sent to the client. That will often prompt additional points being added to the PSI Check list for specific features to be checked.

Samples can also be sent by the inspector directly to a pre agreed lab for final testing and any additional certification, etc.

Contact QPILtd to discuss how we can assist you in avoiding such nightmares.

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